International Journal of Immunology is a peer-reviewed open access journal that publishes original research articles as well as review articles in all areas of immunology. Immunology is a diverse and growing discipline that can be defined as the study of the tissues, cells and molecules involved in host defense mechanisms. Immunologists attempt to understand how the immune system develops, how the body defends itself against disease, and what happens when it all goes wrong. Priority is given to work that provides fundamental insight into the workings of the immune system. Areas covered include, but are not limited to, innate immunity and inflammation; development; immune receptors, signaling and apoptosis; antigen presentation; gene regulation and recombination; cellular and systemic immunity; vaccines; immune tolerance; autoimmunity and tumor immunology, microbial immunopathology; and transplantation.

The great advances in immunology in recent years make this field one of the most dynamic and rapidly growing in biological sciences. This remarkable growth is stimulated by the influx of investigators from other disciplines such as biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, microbiology, virology and various medical disciplines. These disciplines are so well interlinked with immunology that no immunological challenge can now be properly addressed without sophisticated applications of expertise of combinations of these disciplines. As a consequence, immunology has become a vast and rich field encompassing discoveries and outlooks that range from the highly clinical to the highly molecular. Although such perspectives may appear diverse, they are, in fact, extremely interdependent. The journal seeks to present a balanced overview of contemporary immunology and melds together different aspects of molecular immunology, immunobiology and clinical immunology.

Immunology is the branch of biomedical science that deals with the response of an organism to antigenic challenge and its recognition of what is self and what is not. It deals with the defense mechanisms including all physical, chemical and biological properties of the organism that help it to combat its susceptibility to foreign organisms, material, etc

Immunology has its origins in the study of how the body protects itself against infectious diseases caused by microorganisms, such as bacteria, viruses, protozoa, and fungi, and also parasitic organisms, such as helminth worms. Research / review articles deals with, among other things, the physiological functioning of the immune system in states of both health and disease; malfunctions of the immune system in immunological disorders (autoimmune diseases, hypersensitivities, immune deficiency, transplant rejection); the physical, chemical and physiological characteristics of the components of the immune system in vitro, in situ, and in vivo are of prime interest.


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Members

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Aaron Lerner

Professor

After receiving his MD from the Sakler school of medicine, Tel-Aviv University (1976), Professor Lerner  specialized in Pediatrics ( 1982 ), Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition (  1984 ) and Adult Gastroenterology ( 1987). Took several senior positions as head of Department of pediatrics (1995-2005) and head of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition unit, at the Carmel Medical Center, Haifa, Israel.Finished his Medical Management degreeM.H.A, at Ben- Gurion University, Beer-Sheba, Israel (1999), spent research sabbaticals in Hahnemann University, Philadelphia, PA, USA (1991), State University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N.C,U.S.A (2005) and currently, involved In scientific projects in Aesku.Kipp Institute, Wendelsheim, Germany.(2014-17). 

Main clinical interests: pediatric nutrition, nutritional assessment and deficiencies, celiac and Crohn’s diseases, microbiome and autoimmunity, processed food additives and autoimmunity, Mendelian and poly-genetic conditions and characterization of new genetic disease like glycogen storage disease XIc, Congenital alpha-glucosidase deficiency, New mutations in Cystic fibrosis, Peutz Jeger syndrome, ataxia telangiectasia .

Main research area: pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of systemic autoimmune diseases (ADs) in particular gastrointestinal conditions, environmental inducers of ADs, micro/dysbiosis and the place of post-translational modification of protein in ADs induction, new serological marker of celiac disease (anti endomysial in 1984, anti-neo-epitope tTg in 2011, anti-microbial and anti neo microbial transglutaminase in 2014-7), Industrial food processing additive that breach tight-junction integrity, the multi gut-remote organs’ axes in systemic autoimmunity and the non-celiac side effects of gluten.

Prof. Lerner presented in numerous international congresses, mainly of pediatrics,nutrition and autoimmunity,published 270 manuscripts in peer reviewed journals and is on the editorial board of 20 international journals.

Main clinical interests: pediatric nutrition, nutritional assessment and deficiencies, celiac and Crohn’s diseases, microbiome and autoimmunity, processed food additives and autoimmunity, Mendelian and poly-genetic conditions and characterization of new genetic disease like glycogen storage disease XIc, Congenital alpha-glucosidase deficiency, New mutations in Cystic fibrosis, Peutz Jeger syndrome, ataxia telangiectasia .

Main research area: pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of systemic autoimmune diseases (ADs) in particular gastrointestinal conditions, environmental inducers of ADs, micro/dysbiosis and the place of post-translational modification of protein in ADs induction, new serological marker of celiac disease (anti endomysial in 1984, anti-neo-epitope tTg in 2011, anti-microbial and anti neo microbial transglutaminase in 2014-7), Industrial food processing additive that breach tight-junction integrity, the multi gut-remote organs’ axes in systemic autoimmunity and the non-celiac side effects of gluten.

  1. Lerner A, Matthias T. Changes in intestinal tight junction permeability associated with industrial food additives explain the rising incidence of autoimmune disease. Autoimmun Rev. 2015;14:479-89.
  2.  Lerner A, Matthias T. Possible association between celiac disease and bacterial transglutaminase in food processing: a hypothesis. Nutr Rev. 2015;73:544-552.
  3. Lerner A, Matthias T. Rheumatoid arthritis-celiac disease relationship: joints get that gut feeling. Autoimm Rev. 2015:14:1038-47. 
  4. Lerner A, Neidhöfer S, Matthias T. Transglutaminase 2 and anti transglutaminase 2 autoantibodies in celiac disease and beyond: Part A: TG2 double-edged sword: gut and extraintestinal involvement. Immunome Research, 2015;11:101-105.
  5. Lerner A, Neidhöfer S, Matthias T.  Transglutaminase 2 and anti transglutaminase 2 autoantibodies in celiac disease and beyond. Part B: Anti- Transglutaminase 2 autoantibodies: friends or enemies. Immunome Research, 2015;11:3-7.
  6. A Lerner, P Jeremias, S Neidhöfer, T Matthias. Antibodies against neo-epitope tTg complexed to gliadin are different and more reliable then anti-tTg for the diagnosis of pediatric celiac disease. J. Immunol Methods. 2016;429:15-20.
  7. A Lerner, R Aminov, T Matthias.  Dysbiosis may trigger autoimmune diseases via inappropriate posttranslational modification of host proteins. Frontiers in Microbiology, 2016;7: article 84.
  8. Lerner A, Matthias T. GUT-the Trojan horse in remote organs’ autoimmunity. Journal of Clinical & Cellular Immunology, 2016;7:401.
  9. Matthias T, Jeremias P, Neidhöfer S, Lerner A. The industrial food additive microbial transglutaminase, mimics the tissue transglutaminase and is immunogenic in celiac disease patients. Autoimmun Rev 2016;15:1111-1119.
  10. A Lerner, R Aminov, T Matthias. Intestinal dysbiotic transglutaminases are potential environmental drivers of systemic autoimmunogenesis. Frontiers in Microbiology, 2017;8;article 66.
  11. Lerner A, Jeremias P, Neidhöfer S, Matthias T. Comparison of the reliability of 17 celiac disease associated bio-markers to reflect intestinal damage J of Clin & Cell Immunology. 2017;8:
  12. Lerner A, Matthias T. Extraintestinal manifestations of CD: Common pathways in the gut-remote organs’ axes. Internat J Celiac Dis.  2017;5:24-27.
  13. Lerner A, Arleevskaya M, Schmiedl A, Matthias T. Microbes and viruses are bugging the gut in celiac disease. Are they friends or foes? Frontiers in Microbiol. 2017; 8:1392.
  14. Lerner A, Shoenfeld Y, Matthias T. Adverse effects of gluten ingestion and advantages of gluten withdrawal in nonceliac autoimmune disease. Nutr Rev. 2017;75:1046-1058. DOI: 10.1093/nutrit/nux054  2017
  15. Lerner A, Aminov R, Matthias T.  Horizontal gene transfer in the human gut. Frontiers in Immunology, 2017;8:article 1630
  16. Lerner A, Matthias T. Gluten free diet- tough alley in torrid time. Internat J of Celiac Disease 2017;5:50-55.
  17. Lerner A, Neidhöfer S, Matthias T. The gut microbiome feelings of the brain: perspective for Non-Microbiologists. Microorganisms, 2017;5(4),66
  18. Lerner A, Matthias T. A Silent or Hypo-symptomatic Disease Can Erupt: Acute Presentations of Celiac Disease. Internat J Celiac Did 2017;5:129-132.
  19. Lerner A, Ramesh A, Matthias T. Are Non-Celiac Autoimmune Diseases Responsive to Gluten-Free Diet? Intrenat J Celiac Disease 2017;5:164-167.
  20. Lerner A, Matthias T. International journal of celiac disease: fouryear interval summary. Internat J Celiac Dis. 2018;6:1-3.